© All pictures, text layout & video copyright © 2018 (Belire UK & Spain). All rights reserved

Boxer Health Issues (work in progress)

ALL breeds of dog can suffer from hereditary or nonhereditary health issues, the importance is that breeders understand all hereditary problems within their breed. Reputable breeders will test their breeding stock for such problems, then not line breed from stock effected by them or simply do not breed from them depending on the particular condition, severity, history and latest advice from their countries breed club and others. We support the aims of the Boxer Club Espana and follow their health guidelines and testing schemes. Let us look at both hereditary and nonhereditary issues separately;

Main Hereditary Health Issues in Boxers

Heart diseases

Boxers worldwide can suffer from congenital heart disease, in particular arterial stenosis and pulmonic stenosis. In the UK, the British Boxer Club has a scheme where approved vets listen by stethoscope and rate the Boxer for arterial stenosis simply based on their findings. The Boxer Club Espana goes one step further and tests for both requiring a Doppler ultrasound examination. There are veterinary surgeons in Spain trained to the same standards as the UK approved ones and we are lucky that our vet is one of them and checks every one of our dogs and puppies. In addition, we put many of our Boxers through the Club scheme when they are old enough, which is at over 12 months of age.

Hip Dysplasia

Boxers worldwide can suffer from Hip Dyslasia but it is less of a problem than above. Hip dysplasia is a malformation of the hip joint leading in later life to osteoarthritis. The hip joint is a ball and socket joint, where the top of the thigh bone (femur) fits into a socket in the pelvis. The bones are held in place by ligaments. Hip dysplasia occurs when the socket is poorly formed or the ligaments are loose, enabling the ball of the femur to slide part way out of its socket. Over time this causes degeneration of the joint (osteoarthritis) and the dog eventually can suffer pain, depending on the severity and become weak or lame in the back legs.

Spondylosis

Spondylosis (also known as Spondylosis Deformans) and is a severe arthritic condition of the spine. Osteophytes form between the vertebrae, essentially fusing the vertebrae together. Some studies show a higher incidence in females than males. This condition is irreversible, and is said to be caused by genetic inheritance, or spinal injury. The symptoms are stiffness in the back, lameness in one or more limbs, change of gait, aggression, upset stomach (a stress reaction to the pain), depression or any combination of these. The symptoms may come and go, but steadily get worse as the osteophytes grow. The more severely affected dogs may also have loss of reflexes. In a recent Italian study, some 84% of Boxer dogs were found to be effected by spondylosis to some degree. In 1991 a Norway study looked at 402 randomly chosen boxers from 29 different sires, 91% had some degree of osteophytes. Belire Boxers does not breed from animals found to have Spondylosis unless they are certified within acceptable guidlines issued by the Boxer Club Espana

JKD in Boxers

Please refer to jkdinboxers.com

Main Nonhereditary Health Issues in Boxers

Cancer.

Boxers worldwide are prone to the development of mast cell tumours, lymphoma and brain tumours. It is said that white boxers and coloured boxers with over white markings should be protected from the sun, as they are liable to develop skin cancer if allowed to burn.

Bloat, Gastric Dilation

Bloating and twisting of a dog's stomach is a serious often fatel condition. It may be caused by overeating, but often there is no underlying cause. Gas accumulation in the stomach is usually associated with volvulus of the stomach, which prevents gas from escaping. Deep-chested breeds like the Boxer are especially at risk. Mortality rates in dogs range from 10 to 60 percent, even with treatment. Some suggest that feeding a Boxer with the feeding bowl off the ground, certainly helps avoid bloat.

Boxer Health Issues

(work in progress)

ALL breeds of dog can suffer from hereditary or nonhereditary health issues, the importance is that breeders understand all hereditary problems within their breed. Reputable breeders will test their breeding stock for such problems, then not line breed from stock effected by them or simply do not breed from them depending on the particular condition, severity, history and latest advice from their countries breed club and others. We support the aims of the Boxer Club Espana and follow their health guidelines and testing schemes. Let us look at both hereditary and nonhereditary issues separately;

Main Hereditary Health Issues in Boxers

Heart diseases

Boxers worldwide can suffer from congenital heart disease, in particular arterial stenosis and pulmonic stenosis. In the UK, the British Boxer Club has a scheme where approved vets listen by stethoscope and rate the Boxer for arterial stenosis simply based on their findings. The Boxer Club Espana goes one step further and tests for both requiring a Doppler ultrasound examination. There are veterinary surgeons in Spain trained to the same standards as the UK approved ones and we are lucky that our vet is one of them and checks every one of our dogs and puppies. In addition, we put many of our Boxers through the Club scheme when they are old enough, which is at over 12 months of age.

Hip Dysplasia

Boxers worldwide can suffer from Hip Dyslasia but it is less of a problem than above. Hip dysplasia is a malformation of the hip joint leading in later life to osteoarthritis. The hip joint is a ball and socket joint, where the top of the thigh bone (femur) fits into a socket in the pelvis. The bones are held in place by ligaments. Hip dysplasia occurs when the socket is poorly formed or the ligaments are loose, enabling the ball of the femur to slide part way out of its socket. Over time this causes degeneration of the joint (osteoarthritis) and the dog eventually can suffer pain, depending on the severity and become weak or lame in the back legs.

Spondylosis

Spondylosis (also known as Spondylosis Deformans) and is a severe arthritic condition of the spine. Osteophytes form between the vertebrae, essentially fusing the vertebrae together. Some studies show a higher incidence in females than males. This condition is irreversible, and is said to be caused by genetic inheritance, or spinal injury. The symptoms are stiffness in the back, lameness in one or more limbs, change of gait, aggression, upset stomach (a stress reaction to the pain), depression or any combination of these. The symptoms may come and go, but steadily get worse as the osteophytes grow. The more severely affected dogs may also have loss of reflexes. In a recent Italian study, some 84% of Boxer dogs were found to be effected by spondylosis to some degree. In 1991 a Norway study looked at 402 randomly chosen boxers from 29 different sires, 91% had some degree of osteophytes. Belire Boxers does not breed from animals found to have Spondylosis unless they are certified within acceptable guidlines issued by the Boxer Club Espana

JKD in Boxers

Please refer to jkdinboxers.com

Main Nonhereditary Health Issues in

Boxers

Cancer.

Boxers worldwide are prone to the development of mast cell tumours, lymphoma and brain tumours. It is said that white boxers and coloured boxers with over white markings should be protected from the sun, as they are liable to develop skin cancer if allowed to burn.

Bloat, Gastric Dilation

Bloating and twisting of a dog's stomach is a serious often fatel condition. It may be caused by overeating, but often there is no underlying cause. Gas accumulation in the stomach is usually associated with volvulus of the stomach, which prevents gas from escaping. Deep-chested breeds like the Boxer are especially at risk. Mortality rates in dogs range from 10 to 60 percent, even with treatment. Some suggest that feeding a Boxer with the feeding bowl off the ground, certainly helps avoid bloat.